Monthly Archives: March 2016

Smog and Depression

While we know smog affects our respiratory and cardiovascular system health, it could also have important implications for mental health and cognitive abilities.

Research by Shakira Franco Suglia, ScD, of the School of Public Health at Boston University, and colleagues found that higher levels of exposure to black carbon was associated with lower memory test scores and verbal and nonverbal IQ in a sample of 200 children in Boston, whom they followed from birth through age 10 (American Journal of Epidemiology, 2008).  Rrederica Perera, DrPH, from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues found higher levels of attention problems, anxiety and depression symptoms among children with higher levels of exposure to air pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are widespread byproducts of fossil fuel combustion, while in utero  (Environmental Health Perspectives, 2012).

Source:  http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/07-08/smog.aspx